arctic

Stop climate change

Last edited 8 May 2017 at 12:25pm

Climate change isn't inevitable. We have the knowledge, skills and technologies to get ourselves out of this difficult situation. All over the world people have woken up to the threat, and are working to reduce the use of fossil fuels, stop rainforest destruction and get power from clean energy. Still much more needs to be done.

License: All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace

Captain's Blog: New generation

Posted by lisavickers — 9 September 2010 at 4:40pm - Comments

Waldermar, captain of the Esperanza, writes about his personal motivations for bringing the ship to the Arctic... 

I'm from South America, the land of the Incas, the Guaraníes, the Wichis, the Tobas, the Mapuches, the Onas, and other native nations.

Video: Esperanza to climb team, over

Posted by jamie — 2 September 2010 at 3:46pm - Comments

This was the scene on the Esperanza's bridge as Luke called through to Sim on the Stena Don for the last time, as the climbers prepared to leave the oil rig. Apologies for the audio which is a bit fuzzy, but here's a transcript:

Fishing for plankton is ridiculous.

Posted by Willie — 1 June 2016 at 5:04pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: http://spongebob.wikia.com/wiki/Sheldon_J._Plankton/gallery
Plankton is justifiably outraged.

In the ocean, plankton is food.

There are two types of plankton – tiny plants (phytoplankton) and tiny animals (zooplankton).

Zooplankton includes some eggs and larvae of things like fish and crabs, as well as some minute animals that feed on phytoplankton. That makes them the first link in any food chain, and the basis for all of the ocean’s food webs.

Fishing industry strike groundbreaking deal for Arctic protection

Last edited 25 May 2016 at 11:12am
25 May, 2016

McDonald’s, Tesco, Birds Eye commit to halt expansion of industrial cod fishing in key Arctic region

Leading seafood brands, major UK’s supermarkets and some of the world’s largest fishing companies, have struck a groundbreaking deal today to protect a key Arctic region from industrial fishing for cod. In a joint statement, companies including McDonald’s, Tesc

It’s Time for Norway to Show Leadership on Arctic Protection

Posted by Trillia Fidei — 18 May 2016 at 4:57pm - Comments
Colourful postcard addressed to the Norwegian Embassy
All rights reserved. Credit: Angela Glienicke / Greenpeace
Postcard calling for Norway to protect the Arctic

Over the past few months, more than 3,000 people all around the country signed handwritten postcards addressed to Her Excellency Ms Mona Juul, the Norwegian Ambassador to the UK.

Lights, camera, direct action: 6 times Emma Thompson spoke up for the planet

Posted by Danielle Boobyer — 27 April 2016 at 10:01am - Comments
Emma and Sophie Thompson jump over a fence
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
Emma and Sophie Thompson jump over a fence

Today Emma Thompson and her sister Sophie are occupying a fracking site. The actors are using whisks, spoons & cake to challenge fracking with their unusual protest - the Frack Free Bake Off.

Emma’s no stranger to speaking up for our planet. From marching for climate justice to protesting outside Shell's HQ with a giant polar bear puppet, this is one actor who's not afraid of direct action.

5 Lesser-Known Threats to the Fragile Arctic Ocean

Posted by Emily Buchanan — 15 April 2016 at 5:44pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Eve Lloyd Knight
Eve Lloyd Knight

You probably know that climate change is melting Arctic ice with astonishing speed. While some hear a warning bell, others see a business opportunity and as the ice disappears, oil companies and fishing fleets are moving further north than ever before, keen to exploit the unexplored ocean opening up at the top of the world.

We kicked out Shell, but there’s a new threat to the Arctic

Posted by Mads Flarup Chr... — 2 March 2016 at 12:05pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace

Together we kicked out Shell, 7 million people across the world stopped Shell’s expansion into the Arctic last year. Later in the year nations came together in Paris and signed a historical agreement for the climate. These events are clear signs that the world is entering into a new era, where fossil fuels are placed in a museum, making room for a sustainable future.