impacts

About climate change

Last edited 4 September 2013 at 1:27pm

Climate change is the greatest environmental threat humanity has ever faced and the biggest challenge. Climate change is caused by the build up of greenhouse gases - from burning fossil fuels and the destruction of areas that store massive amounts of carbon like the world's rainforests. No one knows how much warming is “safe” but we know that climate change is already harming people and ecosystems around the globe.

We're campaigning for climate solutions that still allow people to prosper without damaging the planet including increasing energy efficiency, clean energy and protecting the world's rainforests.

The causes


Our impact

Last edited 9 December 2010 at 6:35pm

Our first campaign - to stop nuclear testing - eventually led to The Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. Since then, with the support of 2.8 million people worldwide, we’ve won hundreds of successes in our campaigns for a greener and more peaceful world.

Our successes

Would you care about climate change more if you lived in a mud hut?

Posted by bex — 17 April 2008 at 12:49pm - Comments

Archbishop Desmond Tutu

Archbishop Desmond Tutu on the Greenpeace ship MV Esperanza in 2002

That's what Archbishop Desmond Tutu is asking the leaders of the most polluting economies, living up to his reputation for calling a spade a spade in, um, spades.

Ice stories, in glorious colour

Posted by bex — 20 February 2008 at 7:04pm - Comments

Greenland glacier by Nick Cobbing

An iceberg made of hard, dense ice reflects late evening light
© Greenpeace/Cobbing

Oooh, this is gorgeous. I know some of Nick Cobbing's photographs pretty well (he's done a fair bit of work for Greenpeace in the past) but, on the advice of our picture editor, I went to have a nose around his website where he's organised some of his photos into stories.

Greenpeace on shrinking Arctic sea ice

Last edited 21 September 2007 at 11:22am
21 September, 2007

Reacting to new data showing record shrinking of Arctic sea ice, Greenpeace executive director John Sauven said:

Message from the North: "Climate change is upon us"

Posted by bex — 31 July 2007 at 10:44am - Comments

A glacial melt lake in Greenland
A glacial melt lake in Greenland.

It's becoming pretty obvious that the aviation industry is creeping closer and closer to the tactics of big tobacco and big oil in their attempts to "teach the controversy" over science that doesn't suit their profit margins.

Last week, it was an outrageous display of bullying aimed at groups concerned about climate change. A couple of weeks ago, there was another, smaller episode that got a lot less press; the aviation industry's briefing against an Inuit leader who came to the UK to tell his "southern neighbours" that the people of the Arctic are already feeling the impacts of climate change.

Climate change to blame for more Atlantic hurricanes

Posted by bex — 30 July 2007 at 2:57pm - Comments

The aftermath of Hurricane Andrew
The aftermath of Hurricane Andrew.

After a study last week confirmed the link between climate change and increased rainfall in the UK, a new study published yesterday has made the connection between climate change and a doubling in the number of Atlantic hurricanes in an average season over the past 100 years.

Five top tips for green summer living

Posted by jossc — 26 July 2007 at 2:22pm - Comments

Tips for green living

Although it doesn't feel much like it we're well into summertime now, our colleagues at Greenpeace Canada have put together a list of top tips to help you 'keep it green' whatever you're doing this summer. Among other things, they've got green ideas for organic gardening, keeping party food local and sustainable, and minimising your CO2 emissions should you decide to travel.

Official: burning fossil fuels has changed rainfall patterns in the UK

Posted by bex — 24 July 2007 at 2:39pm - Comments

Flooding

The Red Cross is stretched to their limits, in Tewkesbury. Thousands of people previously living in Gloucestershire’s rolling hills suddenly find themselves homeless. A third of a million people have no drinking water.

Solving the oil crisis: "We need something like whales, but infinitely more abundant"

Posted by bex — 15 June 2007 at 3:47pm - Comments

Exxon's PR campaign (which seems to run along the lines of "we may fund climate change deniers and oppose Kyoto but we're quite nice really") suffered a slight setback yesterday, when 300 people from the oil industry apparently believed that Exxon's newest fossil fuel was made out of human flesh - belonging to the victims of climate change.

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