Sharks

New trade protections for sharks - but are they enough?

Posted by Willie — 19 October 2016 at 9:01am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: BBC, Carlos Aguilera
Hoo-RAY! A Mobular ray leaps from the ocean after hearing about the new CITES protection for sharks.

Like it or not, around the world many species of animals are seen as tradeable commodities – for things like food, fur, fashion or medicine. Of course we know that historically hunting animals for commercial gain has often been really bad news for the animals concerned. Just stop and think about some of the most recognisable big land mammals – things like tigers, elephants and rhinos – and it’s pretty evident what trade can do to even well-known beasts, pushing many of them to the very brink of extinction.

In Pictures: Celebrate, it's #SharkWeek!

Posted by Angela Glienicke — 24 June 2016 at 4:11pm - Comments

Every year the Discovery Channel dedicates a week to these amazing carnivorous fish. What a great opportunity to share a few of our archive pictures showing what magnificent creatures sharks are and highlighting the threats they face.<--break->

Orange roughy – a ‘sustainable’ fish certification too far.

Posted by Willie — 21 June 2016 at 1:55pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Lizzie Barber / Greenpeace
orange roughy illustration

Orange roughy are easy to over fish. So, humans do. But that doesn't seem to be stopping moves to re-define them as 'sustainable' by the Marine Stewardship Council.

True, when we started fishing orange roughy we didn’t know that this slow-growing, long-lived, deep water fish was particularly susceptible. But now we definitely do. Orange roughy can live to a staggering 150 years old, and are at least 30 years old before they are mature enough to breed. To put that into context: there are probably orange roughy alive today that were born when Queen Victoria was on the throne, and they take about 10 times longer to mature than Atlantic cod.

Behind The Lens

Posted by MeenaRajput — 31 May 2016 at 1:44pm - Comments

Photographer, Will Rose, joined Greenpeace activists on an expedition to the Indian Ocean to remove dozens of destructive Fish Aggregating Devices. These FADs kill endangered marine life including sharks and turtles, but despite this, leading tuna brands John West and Thai Union continue to use them. Since our campaign launched, Tesco and Waitrose have threatened to remove John West from their shelves unless they clean up their act. 

11 awe-inspiring British wildlife-watching moments from #IntotheWild

Posted by Danielle Boobyer — 16 April 2016 at 1:02pm - Comments
Common dolphins leaping from the ocean
All rights reserved. Credit: BBC
Common dolphins swim in Scotland

We’ve fallen in love with British wildlife all over again this week thanks to the wonderful nature footage on BBC’s Into the Wild.

Seven Deadly Fins

Posted by Willie — 30 October 2015 at 3:01pm - Comments
Seven deadly fins - scary creatures from the deep sea
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
Which ocean creature sends a shiver down your spine?

If you go down in the deep today, you might get a big surprise. At Hallowe’en the usual ghosts, ghouls and monsters are all-too-familiar. But if you want a real fright, you really need to see what’s lurking in the sea. 

So, prepare yourself as we introduce you to seven of the spookiest, kookiest and most sinister denizens of the deadly deep, deep sea.

Big Blue Love for Big Blue Live

Posted by Willie — 21 August 2015 at 1:42pm - Comments

Something amazing is happening in Monterey Bay, California. The bay is a marine sanctuary, on the edge of the Pacific Ocean, halfway between San Francisco and Los Angeles. The bay is home to an amazing array of wildlife: everything from cute, cuddly sea otters to prehistoric pelicans, from massive kelp forests to gigantic blue whales. But the big news is that BBC is kindly bringing all of this right into your living room with a massive live TV event called Big Blue Live.

The next UK government promises to be an ocean champion

Posted by Willie — 20 April 2015 at 10:23am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Enric Sala/ Nat Geo

Here’s a prediction: the next UK government will do great things for global marine protection.

At this stage in a general election campaign it’s sometimes hard to find something that politicians wearing differently coloured rosettes can agree on, but with an unprecedented bunch of manifesto commitments, there’s a growing certainty that the next UK government will be an ocean champion.

Challenging the UK government to lead the world in ocean protection.

Posted by Willie — 10 February 2015 at 4:02pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Enric Sala/Nat Geo

If I said to you that the UK government was responsible for rare sea turtles, endangered sharks, tropical coral reefs and quite possibly more penguins than any other country, you might think I was talking about some aquariums or zoos. It’s certainly not what you think about in UK seas, especially at this grey time of year (though of course we do have visiting turtles, many shark species, cold water corals, and puffins as penguin-wannabes). But across the world the UK has ‘overseas territories’. They are relics of a turbulent past when flags were planted across the world, and mostly, these days, they are islands – like Bermuda, Pitcairn, and Ascension. So, in turn, the amazing wildlife in the seas around these islands is effectively ‘British’.

For the oceans - every week is Shark Week!

Posted by Willie — 7 August 2014 at 1:50pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace / Alex Hofford

‘Shark’:  it’s an evocative and symbolic single syllable. Just the sound of the word conjures up a host of associated images, usually to do with menacing fins, teeth, and a certain cinematic soundtrack.  #SharkWeek ramps up the public awareness around sharks, but it’s also a chance to reconsider and revalue these iconic, and undoubtedly awesome, ocean creatures.

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