plastic pollution

A brand new plastic bottle every time you feel thirsty?

Posted by Aakash Naik — 14 March 2017 at 6:09pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Will Rose / Greenpeace

I love fizzy drinks, at the cinema with my snacks, at lunchtime always, at dinner, but never with breakfast, honest….

A love for fizzy drinks should never mean our oceans and the creatures who call it home, have to suffer, but every time we use brand new plastic bottles and don’t recycle them, that’s exactly what’s happening. 

In the UK alone we use 35 million plastic bottles every day, but nearly half of these are not recycled.

Greenpeace report reveals plastic footprint of world’s largest soft drinks companies

Last edited 15 March 2017 at 7:04am
14 March, 2017

Greenpeace UK has conducted the first ever comprehensive survey of the plastic footprints and policies of the top six global soft drinks brands: Coca-Cola, PepsiCo, Suntory, Danone, Dr Pepper Snapple and Nestlé.

Despite plastic bottles forming a major source of ocean plastic pollution, the survey results reveal a woeful lack of action by the soft drinks industry to prevent their plastic bottles ending up in our oceans. 

“The results are jaw-dropping,” said Louise Edge, senior oceans campaigner at Greenpeace UK. “It’s clear that if we’re going to protect our oceans we need to end the age of throwaway plastic. These companies need to take drastic action now.”

Key findings:

It’s ‘make or break time for the microbeads ban’, say campaigners

Last edited 28 February 2017 at 1:37pm
28 February, 2017

On the day the Government’s microbeads consultation closes, businesses have joined environmental campaigners in calling for a comprehensive ban on microbeads. Campaigners have warned that the current proposals would see the ban limited to microplastic ingredients of 5mm or less in ‘rinse off’ personal care and cosmetic products, while other products containing microplastics could continue to be sold.

Campaigners from the Microbeads Coalition said it was ‘make or break time for the microbeads ban’, as businesses including health and beauty brand Neal’s Yard Remedies, NCH Europe, which produces industrial cleaning products, and Anglian Water, who are leading the national campaign on unflushables, called on the Government to implement a complete ban on microplastic ingredients.

Deposit Return Schemes - what exactly are they?

Posted by Fiona Nicholls — 22 February 2017 at 5:50pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Will Rose / Greenpeace

You may have seen the term Deposit Return Scheme batted around lately- but what exactly does it mean?

The way I like to think of it is this - with a DRS, you buy the contents of a bottle (glug glug, delicious smoothie), but only borrow the bottle. The tiny deposit paid on top of the drink is fully refundable once the empty bottle is returned. This bottle can then be recycled or (even better!) reused.

Coca-Cola U-turn on opposition to bottle deposit schemes - Greenpeace comment

Last edited 22 February 2017 at 10:51am
22 February, 2017

Responding to news this morning that Coca-Cola has U-turned on its opposition to bottle deposit return schemes, Louise Edge, senior oceans campaigner at Greenpeace UK, said:

‘Following Greenpeace’s investigation into Coca-Cola’s lobbying against bottle deposit schemes, we welcome this change of heart. Deposit schemes, which have growing support amongst the public, politicians and industry, can play a key role in reducing the amount of plastic which ends up in our oceans and in landfill. But with up to 12 million tonnes of plastic entering the sea every year, the bigger challenge which companies need to step up to, especially leading brands like Coke, is drastically reducing their plastic footprint.

Government must avoid loopholes in microbeads ban

Last edited 3 January 2017 at 10:59am
20 December, 2016

Responding to reports that the Government's consultation on microbeads will be launched this week, a joint statement by the Environmental Investigation Agency, Fauna & Flora International, Greenpeace UK and the Marine Conservation Society, said:

We are very pleased to welcome the launch of this consultation, and we look forward to working with the Government to ensure that these tiny harmful plastics no longer reach our oceans.

However, it must cover all microplastics as marine life doesn’t distinguish between plastic from a face wash and plastic from a washing detergent, so the microbeads ban must cover all plastics in all household and industrial products that can go down our drains.

A deposit return scheme for Scotland?

Posted by alice.hunter — 11 November 2016 at 6:55pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: mark ferguson / Alamy Stock Photo
Plastic pollution on a beach in Orkney

A truckload of plastic waste enters our oceans every minute.

When I first heard this statistic I couldn’t believe it. But the evidence is all around us - from tiny microbeads in our toothpaste to images of seabirds with stomachs full of plastic. Plastic pollution is out of control.

A joint mission: ending plastic pollution

Posted by Louise Edge — 14 September 2016 at 4:27pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Ariana Densham, Greenpeace

Back in July I was lucky enough to be one of 100 people who spent the day cleaning up a heavily plastic polluted beach on ‘Freedom Island’ in Manila Bay, Philippines. The beach was in an appalling state - piled high with throwaway plastic wrappers, straws and bottles which also littered the water. This was just a snapshot of the estimated 8-12 million tonnes of plastic that scientists tell us goes into our oceans every year.<--break-><--break->

UK Government plans to outlaw microbeads! But a limited ban won't do.

Posted by Fiona Nicholls — 7 September 2016 at 9:43am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace

This weekend, the Environment Secretary Andrea Leadsom announced a plan to ban microbeads from cosmetic products like face scrubs, toothpastes and shower gels. This is brilliant news for the 350,000 people who have signed our petition in collaboration with Fauna & Flora International, the Marine Conservation Society and the Environmental Investigation Agency. It shows the government is taking steps to protect our oceans from this pointless plastic pollution. BUT… (oh why is there always a ‘but’?!)

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