plastic pollution

Government must avoid loopholes in microbeads ban

Last edited 3 January 2017 at 9:59am
20 December, 2016

Responding to reports that the Government's consultation on microbeads will be launched this week, a joint statement by the Environmental Investigation Agency, Fauna & Flora International, Greenpeace UK and the Marine Conservation Society, said:

We are very pleased to welcome the launch of this consultation, and we look forward to working with the Government to ensure that these tiny harmful plastics no longer reach our oceans.

However, it must cover all microplastics as marine life doesn’t distinguish between plastic from a face wash and plastic from a washing detergent, so the microbeads ban must cover all plastics in all household and industrial products that can go down our drains.

A deposit return scheme for Scotland?

Posted by alice.hunter — 11 November 2016 at 5:55pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: mark ferguson / Alamy Stock Photo
Plastic pollution on a beach in Orkney

A truckload of plastic waste enters our oceans every minute.

When I first heard this statistic I couldn’t believe it. But the evidence is all around us - from tiny microbeads in our toothpaste to images of seabirds with stomachs full of plastic. Plastic pollution is out of control.

A joint mission: ending plastic pollution

Posted by louise — 14 September 2016 at 3:27pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Ariana Densham, Greenpeace

Back in July I was lucky enough to be one of 100 people who spent the day cleaning up a heavily plastic polluted beach on ‘Freedom Island’ in Manila Bay, Philippines. The beach was in an appalling state - piled high with throwaway plastic wrappers, straws and bottles which also littered the water. This was just a snapshot of the estimated 8-12 million tonnes of plastic that scientists tell us goes into our oceans every year.<--break-><--break->

UK Government plans to outlaw microbeads! But a limited ban won't do.

Posted by Fiona Nicholls — 7 September 2016 at 8:43am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace

This weekend, the Environment Secretary Andrea Leadsom announced a plan to ban microbeads from cosmetic products like face scrubs, toothpastes and shower gels. This is brilliant news for the 350,000 people who have signed our petition in collaboration with Fauna & Flora International, the Marine Conservation Society and the Environmental Investigation Agency. It shows the government is taking steps to protect our oceans from this pointless plastic pollution. BUT… (oh why is there always a ‘but’?!)

Greenpeace report identifies growing risk of plastic in seafood

Last edited 25 August 2016 at 9:07am
25 August, 2016

Just a day after a cross-party group of MPs called on the Government to ban microbeads, a new Greenpeace report lays out the science on the impact of microplastics, including microbeads, on our oceans and our seafood.

The report, which collates the latest academic research, identifies the risks of these tiny plastics spreading toxic chemicals, being eaten by marine life and even travelling up the food chain to the seafood on our plates.  

Plastics in Seafood

Last edited 25 August 2016 at 6:56am

This report lays out the science on the impact of microplastics, including microbeads, on our oceans and our seafood.

Plastics in Seafood, which collates the latest academic research, identifies the risks of these tiny plastics spreading toxic chemicals, being eaten by marine life and even travelling up the food chain to the seafood on our plates.

From L’Oreal to Revlon, which brands are polluting the ocean with microbeads?

Posted by Elisabeth Whitebread — 21 July 2016 at 11:27am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace

(PS - it’s all of them!)<--break->

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