Plastic

A rubbish truck of plastic in the ocean every minute  -  and how you can help

Posted by Fiona Nicholls — 17 November 2016 at 11:09am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace/Will Rose

With the ebb and flow of the tides, thousands of miles of coastline around the UK testify to the devastation that plastic pollution is having on the marine environment. The oceans are at their choking point, for every mile of beach surveyed there are 159 plastic bottles found washed up.

A deposit return scheme for Scotland?

Posted by alice.hunter — 11 November 2016 at 5:55pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: mark ferguson / Alamy Stock Photo
Plastic pollution on a beach in Orkney

A truckload of plastic waste enters our oceans every minute.

When I first heard this statistic I couldn’t believe it. But the evidence is all around us - from tiny microbeads in our toothpaste to images of seabirds with stomachs full of plastic. Plastic pollution is out of control.

New trade protections for sharks - but are they enough?

Posted by Willie — 19 October 2016 at 9:01am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: BBC, Carlos Aguilera
Hoo-RAY! A Mobular ray leaps from the ocean after hearing about the new CITES protection for sharks.

Like it or not, around the world many species of animals are seen as tradeable commodities – for things like food, fur, fashion or medicine. Of course we know that historically hunting animals for commercial gain has often been really bad news for the animals concerned. Just stop and think about some of the most recognisable big land mammals – things like tigers, elephants and rhinos – and it’s pretty evident what trade can do to even well-known beasts, pushing many of them to the very brink of extinction.

UK Government plans to outlaw microbeads! But a limited ban won't do.

Posted by Fiona Nicholls — 7 September 2016 at 8:43am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace

This weekend, the Environment Secretary Andrea Leadsom announced a plan to ban microbeads from cosmetic products like face scrubs, toothpastes and shower gels. This is brilliant news for the 350,000 people who have signed our petition in collaboration with Fauna & Flora International, the Marine Conservation Society and the Environmental Investigation Agency. It shows the government is taking steps to protect our oceans from this pointless plastic pollution. BUT… (oh why is there always a ‘but’?!)

6 amazing plastic bans from around the world

Posted by Fiona Nicholls — 29 July 2016 at 4:19pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace

Good news! Plastics bans across the world have been hitting the headlines lately.

From the US to India and Morocco, governing bodies are taking control of the plastic pollution problem, bringing in either complete bans on plastic, or bans on specific forms like polystyrene. 

World's oldest wild bird has a new chick - but is it a doomed messenger in an increasingly polluted ocean?

Posted by Willie — 16 February 2016 at 1:31pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: https://www.facebook.com/hokuleawwv
World's oldest wild bird, Laysan albatross Wisdom & chick | https://www.facebook.com/hokuleawwv

Imagine becoming a parent at the age of 65. It might seem miraculous but that is what has happened to the world’s oldest known wild bird, an Albatross living on an island in the middle of the Pacific Ocean.

New Year's plastic resolution: 5 simple ways to help the ocean.

Posted by Willie — 7 January 2016 at 11:22am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Poldhu Beach Watcher/BBC News

The New Year’s storms have brought a lurid, unmissable reminder to UK beaches, with thousands of bright pink detergent bottles being churned up by the sea. As waves of highly-visible plastic trash hit British beaches, it’s a timely reminder of a much bigger problem: we are turning our oceans into plastic soup. It’s been estimated recently that about EIGHT MILLION TONNES of plastic ends up in the ocean each year.

Plastic Arctic

Posted by claire miller — 5 September 2011 at 10:57am - Comments
Scientist Clare Miller on Arctic Sunrise
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace / Nick Cobbing
Scientist Clare Miller collecting data on the amount of plastics in the Arctic ocean, on the Arctic Sunrise

For many people the Arctic is seen as one of the last wilderness regions left where there has been limited human impact. However, sampling of marine plastic debris over the past few days shows that the far reaching effects of mankind is clearly present even in the Arctic ocean.

Modern art is (made from) rubbish

Posted by saunvedan — 26 September 2008 at 3:58pm - Comments

The Rainbow Worrier, made from 5,000 plastic bags It's been an arty week for me. After the polar bear sculptures in the US, an outdoor art group in Devon - Trail Recycled Art in Landscape (Trail) - has made a trawler boat out of 5,000 plastic bags and named it Rainbow Worrier after our legendary ship the Rainbow Warrior. They even filled it up with plastic fish in fishing nets to highlight how plastic is destroying marine ecosystems.

Plastic waste isn't just what you see on beaches and coast lines. A plastic dump in the Pacific Ocean as large as Texas is constantly swirling in a massive gyre that is referred to as the 'trash vortex'. Other unflattering names include Asian trash trail and the Eastern Garbage Patch where six kilos of plastic swirls for every kilo of plankton.

Dead seas: human activities are killing off the oceans

Posted by jossc — 15 February 2008 at 2:14pm - Comments

AAAS map of impacts on the N Sea

It's official; mankind is killing off our oceans far faster than previously thought. The first global-scale study of human impacts on marine ecosystems, published today in the flagship US journal Science, reveals a picture of widespread destruction with few if any areas remaining untouched.

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