greg clark

Over 150,000 stand with the people of Lancashire in opposing fracking

Last edited 14 June 2016 at 11:26am
14 June, 2016
Campaigners from Lancashire will today be joined by Greenpeace and Friends of the Earth to deliver a 150,000-strong petition calling on the Government to respect Lancashire’s decision to reject fracking.

Local campaigning groups Frack Free Lancashire, Preston New Road Action Group and Roseacre Awareness Group will also be joined by Lancaster and Fleetwood MP Cat Smith, who says fracking has no “democratic mandate” in Lancashire, following the local council’s decision to prohibit the controversial practice.

Greenpeace ‘frack’ Parliament Square

Last edited 9 February 2016 at 8:46am
9 February, 2016
  • PHOTO CALL – near Gandhi statue from 7.45am the rig will flare and drill hourly
  • Photos will be uploaded on this link throughout the day

 Tuesday 9th February, London - Greenpeace has installed a life-like ten-metre fracking rig and drill at Parliament Square this morning to ‘bring the local impacts of fracking to the heart of democracy’.

A new Populus poll released today by Greenpeace shows that nearly two-thirds (62%) of people in the UK think their local council, not central government departments, should decide whether to accept or reject fracking applications in their local area. 

Greg Clark: The man behind Lancashire’s fracking furore

Posted by Hannah Martin — 13 January 2016 at 12:36pm - Comments
by-nc. Credit: Flickr/Department for Communities and Local Government

In the coming months we'll find out if fracking will be allowed in Lancashire. Even though in June last year the local county council voted against shale gas drilling, David Cameron's Westminster government has since intervened and decided that one minister - Greg Clark - will have the final say.

Local power to the local people

Posted by Graham Thompson — 13 August 2015 at 11:58am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: BBC
There's nothing for you here.

Greenpeace think that energy policy the world over should be localised and democratised. Not only is it more efficient to generate power near where it’s going to be used, but giving communities some control over their power supply has numerous other advantages, many of which are being smugly illustrated on a daily basis by Germany.

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