deposit return schemes

A brand new plastic bottle every time you feel thirsty?

Posted by Aakash Naik — 14 March 2017 at 6:09pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Will Rose / Greenpeace

I love fizzy drinks, at the cinema with my snacks, at lunchtime always, at dinner, but never with breakfast, honest….

A love for fizzy drinks should never mean our oceans and the creatures who call it home, have to suffer, but every time we use brand new plastic bottles and don’t recycle them, that’s exactly what’s happening. 

In the UK alone we use 35 million plastic bottles every day, but nearly half of these are not recycled.

Deposit Return Schemes - what exactly are they?

Posted by Fiona Nicholls — 22 February 2017 at 5:50pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Will Rose / Greenpeace

You may have seen the term Deposit Return Scheme batted around lately- but what exactly does it mean?

The way I like to think of it is this - with a DRS, you buy the contents of a bottle (glug glug, delicious smoothie), but only borrow the bottle. The tiny deposit paid on top of the drink is fully refundable once the empty bottle is returned. This bottle can then be recycled or (even better!) reused.

Coca-Cola U-turn on opposition to bottle deposit schemes - Greenpeace comment

Last edited 22 February 2017 at 10:51am
22 February, 2017

Responding to news this morning that Coca-Cola has U-turned on its opposition to bottle deposit return schemes, Louise Edge, senior oceans campaigner at Greenpeace UK, said:

‘Following Greenpeace’s investigation into Coca-Cola’s lobbying against bottle deposit schemes, we welcome this change of heart. Deposit schemes, which have growing support amongst the public, politicians and industry, can play a key role in reducing the amount of plastic which ends up in our oceans and in landfill. But with up to 12 million tonnes of plastic entering the sea every year, the bigger challenge which companies need to step up to, especially leading brands like Coke, is drastically reducing their plastic footprint.

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