Arctic

Lego, we're feeling sad too

Posted by ianduff — 2 July 2014 at 5:37pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
Lego, don't let Shell play with the Arctic

LEGO says they’re saddened Greenpeace have used its famous brand as a tool in our campaign to stop Shell drilling in the Arctic.

How tiny plastic people protested around the world

Posted by jamie — 1 July 2014 at 3:49pm - Comments

The news of LEGO's cosy relationship with Shell has led to tiny protests erupting around the country - nay, the world. Famous national and international landmarks have been festooned with banners as the streets resounded the stamp of little plastic feet. What a day it's been.

Lego and Shell - FAQs

Posted by Sondhya Gupta — 1 July 2014 at 10:00am - Comments
lego arctic scene with walrus and oil spill
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace

What has Lego got to do with the Arctic?

Lego has a longstanding relationship with Shell, with plans to renew its deal later this year.

Shell wants to drill for oil in the Arctic. The only reason they’re able to do this is because the Arctic ice is melting because of climate change. Something that oil companies are responsible for. Scientists say that it’s extremely risky to drill in the Arctic and any oil spill in those freezing conditions would be impossible to clean up.

It's time for LEGO to block Shell

Posted by ianduff — 30 June 2014 at 5:45pm - Comments
Lego mini protest in front of cathedral
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
Lego protest in front of cathedral

Imagine you’re eight years old and picture the Arctic. There are no oil rigs, no industrial shipping and no politicians fighting over it.

It’s just an endless sparkling expanse of sea and ice, populated by brave scientific explorers, magical animals and Indigenous Peoples who have called the far north home for millennia. An enchanted place to explore, create stories and let your imagination run free.

Our Arctic Sunrise is coming home

Posted by ben — 6 June 2014 at 1:09pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: greenpeace

Earlier this morning we had a remarkable phone call from Murmansk.

The 'get lost zone' - a novel concept in international law

Posted by Daniel Simons — 30 May 2014 at 12:32pm - Comments
The bridge of the Esperanza, with the Transocean Spitsbergen oil rig in the back
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
Statoil has belatedly launched legal challenges to occupation of the Apollo drill site by the Esperanza

Desperate times call for desperate measures. That seems to be the thinking of Norway's petroleum ministry, which yesterday issued a highly irregular order in an attempt to bring an end to the Esperanza's peaceful protest in the Barents Sea.

9 things you didn't know about Bear Island (including 'What is Bear Island?')

Posted by Erlend Tellnes — 28 May 2014 at 3:37pm - Comments
Sign on Bear Island
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Bear Island is a long way from anywhere

There is a fairly good chance this is the first time you've heard about Bear Island. Don’t be alarmed. First time I heard about the island was less than two years ago. So why do I need to know about Bear Island, you might think?

Taking action, in freedom

Posted by faiza_oulahsen — 1 May 2014 at 12:59pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Neugebauer/Greenpeace
Protest against Russian oil tanker transporting oil from the Gazprom drilling platform Prirazlomnaya

Today is the day. The very first barrels of Arctic oil have found their way to my home country. Gazprom, Russia’s biggest energy company, has shipped the first tanker with crude oil from the Arctic to the Rotterdam harbor, the Netherlands.

Six responses to your pension fund about their investment in Shell

Posted by Charlie Kronick — 1 April 2014 at 12:27pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: © Greenpeace

Shell is treading on thin ice. It has already spent over $5 billion on its Arctic drilling venture, but the company has yet to produce a single drop of Arctic oil. No doubt its shareholders and investors are starting to get nervous.

IPCC's global warning means it’s time to get serious about protecting our oceans

Posted by Willie — 31 March 2014 at 11:10am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace

We know climate change is the biggest threat facing our planet, which is why it is Greenpeace’s priority campaign across the world. Today’s report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)’s highlights the enormous impacts and consequences climate change is having on our oceans. This must act as a wake-up call for everyone who depends on, or cares about our oceans and the vast array of life within them.

These are the most important messages from report - and they mean for our oceans.

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