Amazon

In pictures: Love the Amazon on Amazon Day!

Posted by Angela Glienicke — 2 September 2016 at 1:49pm - Comments

5th September is the day the largest rainforest in the world is celebrated in Brazil. It’s Amazon Day! With an estimated 16,000 tree species the Amazon is often referred to as the lungs of the planet. It is also home to over 20 million people, including thousands of Indigenous Peoples, hundreds of bird species and mammals and over 2.5 million insect species!  <--break->

10 years ago, the Amazon was being bulldozed for soy. Then everything changed.

Posted by paulo adario — 16 May 2016 at 9:51am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Ricardo Beliel/Greenpeace
Soy plantation in the Amazon rainforest. The expansion of the soy industry is one of the main causes of deforestation in the region.

This week – after months of negotiation and uncertainty – the Brazilian government, the soy industry and civil society organizations, including Greenpeace, indefinitely renewed an agreement keeping huge swathes of Amazon rainforest from being destroyed for soybean farming. This is big news for the Amazon, for Indigenous Peoples, for farmers, for business and for all of us around the world fighting to end deforestation.

In Pictures: Damning the Amazon

Posted by Angela Glienicke — 13 April 2016 at 2:54pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: © Valdemir Cunha / Greenpeace
Forest next to the Tapajós river, in Sawré Muybu Indigenous Land

A report published this week by Greenpeace Brazil shines a spotlight on technology giant Siemens’ involvement in a massive hydropower dam planned for the Tapajós River.

Brazilian supermarket giant Pão de Açúcar stops buying deforestation beef

Posted by Richardg — 1 April 2016 at 11:09am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Ze Gabriel
Activists in Sao Paulo put stickers on beef saying 'do you know where your beef comes from?'

Great news: Pão de Açúcar – one of Brazil’s major supermarket chains – has finally agreed to stop stocking beef linked to forest destruction. It's a huge victory for Brazilian consumers, who joined Greenpeace's campaign in their thousands - but it's also big deal for the planet. Here's why.

Tracking trees: How one Amazon Indigenous community is using tech to fight illegal logging

Posted by Fran G — 11 September 2015 at 10:19am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: © Lunae Parracho / Greenpeace

For the Ka’apor people of Brazil, protecting the Amazon rainforest isn’t just about climate change or wildlife. It is about survival.

UPDATE: Amazon timber from illegal loggers is heading to Rotterdam

Posted by Richardg — 5 November 2014 at 6:29pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace Ltd
A shipment of illegal timber is on its way to Europe

A shipment of illegal timber from the Amazon rainforest is on its way to Europe. We've discovered that the timber is bound for the port of Rotterdam - and it arrives tomorrow.

Illegal timber from the Amazon is on it's way to Europe. Let's stop it!

Posted by Richardg — 3 November 2014 at 9:42am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace

We've caught sawmills in the Amazon rainforest trading illegal timber. Now a shipment of illegal timber from one of those sawmills is on its way to Europe. If we act quickly, we can force the authorities to take action.

European authorities must act on illegal timber

Posted by Daniela Montalto — 28 October 2014 at 11:55am - Comments
Logging truck in the Amazon
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace

Sawmills in the Brazilian Amazon are laundering illegal timber and sending shipments overseas. It’s against the law to place illegal timber on the European market, yet the authorities are doing very little about it.

We're using GPS trackers to expose illegal logging in the amazon

Posted by Richardg — 15 October 2014 at 12:39pm - Comments
Logging truck in the Amazon
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace

My colleagues - and friends - in Brazil spent two months placing GPS trackers on illegal loggers in the Amazon. It's dangerous - but it helps us expose their crimes to the world.

We're using GPS trackers to expose illegal logging in the amazon

Posted by Richardg — 15 October 2014 at 12:39pm - Comments

My colleagues - and friends - in Brazil spent two months placing GPS trackers on illegal loggers in the Amazon. It's dangerous - but it helps us expose their crimes to the world..

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